Empty Roads and Broken Bottles: In Search of the Great Perhaps

“Here’s to cheap wine straight from the bottle . . . and intelligent conversations about things that matter, roses and butterflies” (5).

“The real lessons are taught when you’re balancing on the very edge, with one foot over the cliff, everyone expecting you to fail” (7).

“He knows his own mind so well that nothing can take away his character” (9).

“All I wanted was to live a life where I could be me and be okay with that. I had no need for material possessions, money, or even close friends with me on my journeys” (14).

“They expected me to have answers and be interested in things I couldn’t care less about” (15).

“So I practiced every single day. I found a way to use my disciplined athlete mind to get up at 6 a.m. every morning and not waste one single second, a second that I could use to develop and become better. If you want something bad enough you can always find a way to get it” (19).

“I studied myself and wrote my life down” (27).

“First of all, loneliness is not to be connected with solitude. Living in solitude for a while is the most important part of finding yourself . . .

“Learn the sound of your own pulse when you lay down to sleep, learn your body, know how long you can walk without food, how hard you can push yourself, how long you can run.

“Don’t settle for a life within the walls of a system. Doing tasks without a heart just because everyone else is living like that.

“You won’t remember the week you worked your ass off at work and then went to that extra fancy restaurant. You will remember how you snuck onto that last train to France and wrote stories for 3 hours” (31).

“The only reason you bare to live like this is because of that unexplainable feeling you get from that thing you love. The feeling that this is what you were born to do. This is your destiny” (36).

“But if you wake up with the thought that your only task is to live and love fully and passionately, TODAY, but not to cling to it–to let it go when it wants to move on–you stop worrying” (42).

“And these things, your personal journey, realizing your nature, is what makes you a good artist, and that’s what this story is all about. Your journey through real life” (45).

“But you open yourself up to the thought that what you seek is also seeking you” (48).

“This is when I learned that if you can live with yourself, you can live anywhere you want in the world, in any way you want” (49).

“To define is to limit and all I really want is to say with this book is that we have oceans left to sail and other worlds to see” (51).

“But today I dedicated myself to myself. I belong to myself again and my only task is to live according to my own definition of happiness and freedom” (52).

“It was all very ordinary until my heart connected with my mind and body, until I aligned with my own rhythm and simply let myself be” (54).

“Dear Universe may I never find myself.”

“I’m prepared to swallow fire and memorize all the 366 sonnets by Petreach or meditate with Siddhartha for six years, because I’m following my nature and it tells me to keep wandering, because wandering is what I know and I’m pretty damn good at it” (62).

Read Empty Roads and Broken Bottles: in Search of the Great Perhaps